SPED 245. Introduction to the Exceptional Child.3 Credits.

This course provides students with a broad overview of exceptional learners. It is a basic overview/survey of all areas and categories of special education. The purpose is to provide an introduction to students with exceptionalities for education as well as noneducation majors. Target subject areas include: knowledge of categorical labels, educational law, program planning and terminology used in the field.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

SPED 370. Special Education Law.3 Credits.

This course focuses on current and relevant federal and state legislation in the field of special education. Special attention is paid to the interplay of services and protections provided by IDEA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). In addition, candidates examine the materials to understand the Every Student Success Act (ESSA) that was recently signed into law. Candidates learn how the law affects the planning and delivery of services to children, adolescents and adults with special needs from birth through adulthood. Candidates learn to interpret case law as well as statutes and other legal memoranda that apply to the rights and protections afforded to people with special needs.

Offered: Every year, Spring

SPED 501. Seminar and Mentoring I.1 Credit.

This course is the first of three seminars that you will take during your program. It is designed to help beginning special education teachers explore the issues that they will encounter in classrooms during their internship. The focus will be on developing an understanding of the laws that govern special education and how they influence the diverse student makeup of our classrooms. Students will be provided with a broad overview of exceptional learners. Knowledge of categorical labels, program planning, behavior management and terminology used in the field of special education will be targeted.

Offered: Every year, Fall

SPED 502. Seminar and Mentoring II.1 Credit.

This second seminar course is designed to support beginning special education teachers as they continue to gain experience in working with special needs students. The focus will be on methods of assessments, progress monitoring, data collection, and program planning. Providing appropriate accommodations and/or modifications to curriculum will also be discussed. Learning modules and other resources will be combined with class discussions on crucial topics in the field of special education.

Prerequisites: Take SPED 501
Offered: Every year, Spring

SPED 503. Seminar and Mentoring III.1 Credit.

This is the final seminar that you will take during your program. It is designed to continue to help beginning special education teachers explore the issues that they will encounter in classrooms during their internship. The focus of this seminar will be on developing an understanding of the specific learning strategies used in the field of special education. Teacher candidates will learn specific strategies and how to provide instructional support to exceptional students so that they can become independent learners. Data based instructional planning will also be included. Transition planning for students planning for post-secondary schooling will also be covered.

Prerequisites: Take SPED 502
Offered: Every year, Fall

SPED 545. Introduction to the Exceptional Child.3 Credits.

This course provides students with a broad overview of exceptional learners. It is a basic overview/survey of all areas and categories of special education. The purpose is to provide an introduction to students with exceptionalities for education as well as noneducation majors. Target subject areas include: knowledge of categorical labels, educational law, program planning and terminology used in the field.

Offered: Every year, All

SPED 552. Teaching in the Inclusive Classroom.3 Credits.

Treatment of exceptional individuals throughout history and the importance of societal values regarding their differences form the basis for students' understanding of special education from its inception to current practices. Topics of discussion include: history and philosophy, laws, guidelines and procedures related to providing special education; the needs of students with exceptionalities, including giftedness; the particular needs of students for whom English is a second language; and instructional considerations for students with exceptionalities in inclusive settings. From a philosophic perspective, students learn skills to include children with exceptionalities in their elementary classrooms.

Prerequisites: Take ED 341 or ED 571;
Corequisites: Take ED 452L.
Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

SPED 564. Teaching Students with Reading and Math Disorders.3 Credits.

In this course, students will develop a greater understanding of reading and math disorders including dyscalculia and dyslexia. This course addresses the neuro-biological origins of dyslexia and dyscalculia and the effects on language, literacy, and mathematics development. Students will study the characteristic symptoms of each disability/disorder, implications of each disorder, diagnosis, and teaching methodologies to support students with these disorders. Students will learn how design and implement evidence-based literacy and math instruction to reach diverse learners.

Offered: Fall

SPED 565. Specific Learning Disabilities: Identification, Instruction and Assessment (LD).3 Credits.

In this course, students have the opportunity to increase their knowledge of specific learning disabilities. Students discuss the supports and strategies that are successful in school so that there is a continuum of strategies that are practiced not just learned. The class expands the student's understanding of the importance of responding to the learning needs of these students in a positive way to help them access the curriculum successfully. The class incorporates tools such as simulations and case studies to understand the challenges and overlaps these SLDs present. Students examine the role of SRBI in identification, as well as questions such as: what makes these disabilities so misdiagnosed/overlooked; which if any are inherited/preventable; are there hidden gifts/talents being overshadowed by LDs; how can including the family in our collaborative efforts benefit the student; how can we identify key strategies to support these students emotionally as well as academically?

Offered: Every year, All

SPED 566. Autism Spectrum Disorders.3 Credits.

Educational practitioners develop a knowledge base of methods for working with students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and associated communication disorders. Focus is on the identification of students, as well as the program planning based on instructional strategies in the areas of academic, behavioral, social-emotional and communication.

Offered: Every year, All

SPED 568. Assessment/Program Planning and Evaluation of Children with Special Needs.3 Credits.

In this course, candidates prepare to administer, score and interpret a wide range of criterion referenced, norm referenced and curriculum-based measurements. Candidates utilize information to identify students with specific learning disabilities, make valid recommendations for programming, design appropriate IEP goals and objectives based on the results, and share information with parents and other professionals.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

SPED 570. Special Education Law.3 Credits.

This course focuses on current and relevant federal and state legislation in the field of special education. Special attention is paid to the interplay of services and protections provided by IDEA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). In addition, candidates examine the materials to understand the Every Student Success Act (ESSA) that was recently signed into law. Candidates learn how the law affects the planning and delivery of services to children, adolescents and adults with special needs from birth through adulthood. Candidates learn to interpret case law as well as statutes and other legal memoranda that apply to the rights and protections afforded to people with special needs.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

SPED 571. Emotional and Behavioral Disorder Identification, Management, and Assessment.3 Credits.

This course examines social-emotional-behavioral functioning in the educational setting. Methods of identification, assessment and instructional planning for students with social-emotional-behavioral disorders are addressed in depth. Comprehensive coverage of behavior management, discipline models and building systems of support are examined and discussed. In this way, behavior and/or different learning needs are understood, modifications and supports are put in place and the student is actively engaged in practicing them. This student-centered method results in positive outcomes across the span of the student's life because the student learns and internalizes successful strategies that work consistently.

Offered: Every year

SPED 572. Educating Young Children with Special Needs.3 Credits.

The needs of the young child with disabilities are explored through an examination of social, adaptive, environmental and family characteristics. Candidates learn how to assess children and provide a developmentally appropriate curriculum. The differences between IEPs and IFSP are a focal point, as well as the importance of working with families and professionals in birth to three programs, preschool programs, and kindergarten through grade 2 classrooms. Community services for the young special needs child also are discussed.

Offered: Every year, Summer

SPED 573. Reading Disorders: Assessment, Planning and Instruction.3 Credits.

This course provides candidates with the knowledge and skills needed to provide appropriate evaluation, program planning and educational experiences for students with reading disorders, including Dyslexia. Specifically, reading assessments, diagnosis of reading disorders, IEP goals/objectives and program recommendations are explored and discussed. Reading instruction at the intervention and special education identification levels are discussed to ensure students' ability to plan educational programming for students including those with Dyslexia. Further, instructional strategies to support students with reading disabilities who are included in the regular education setting are emphasized. Various methodologies to support students with Dyslexia as they access the regular education curriculum and instruction are included.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Summer

SPED 574. Understanding and Teaching Students with Intellectual Disabilities.3 Credits.

This course provides candidates with the information necessary to provide appropriate educational experiences for students with low incidence disabilities, including intellectual impairments, physical impairments and those with multiple areas of impairment. The focus is on promoting participation in the school, home and community through developing appropriate transition goals. Emphasis is placed on the use and effectiveness of assistive technologies in working with these students.

Offered: Every year

SPED 575. Working with Gifted and Talented Students.3 Credits.

This course focuses on characteristics of students identified as "gifted" and "talented." Attention also is paid to those who are "twice exceptional." Candidates explore the early development of these children as well as the ways in which their gifts may affect their relationships with their siblings and families. Areas of study include identification, curriculum design and understanding how to provide for their unique social and emotional development, as well as their academic achievement. (Elective)

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

SPED 576. Designing and Utilizing Assistive Learning Technologies.3 Credits.

This course explores the use of technology to support achievement for individuals with different learning needs. Topics include an overview of the continuum of assistive technologies, from simple to complex; a discussion of theoretical bases, support and guidelines for the use of these technologies; an examination of the principles of Universal Design for Learning; and the exploration of specific tools and devices. Course projects emphasize hands-on experience in using these approaches. (Elective)

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

SPED 579. Practicum in Special Education I.3 Credits.

This course is the first of two separate 3-credit practicums designed to provide each candidate professional practice and authentic experiences working with students who qualify under IDEA as needing special education and related services. In addition to coursework, candidates choose a single primary designation from the student'(s) IEP for their Practicum. From that IEP, they select 1 or 2 goals to focus their work on as they spend 36 contact hours observing, planning, instructing and assessing the student(s). Hours and reflections are recorded in a journal daily. Candidates must design a lesson plan and teach a 10-minute mini-lesson that is filmed based on the goals from the IEP. All data collected throughout each practicum is compiled in an e-portfolio, which catalogs the activities undertaken by the candidates including an analysis and description as well as artifacts collected. The candidate is required to collaborate with the onsite special education teacher. The university professor will either visit or meet with the candidate, collaborating special education teacher, and principal during the practicum. Prerequisite: Qualifying employment in a school for the duration of the Practicum.

Offered: Every year, Fall

SPED 580. Practicum in Special Education II.3 Credits.

This course is the second of two separate 3-credit practicums designed to provide each candidate professional practice and authentic experiences working with one or more students who qualify under IDEA as needing special education and related services. For this Practicum, candidates must choose a completely different primary disability than they chose for SPED 579. In addition to coursework, candidates must select 1 or 2 goals to focus their work on as they spend 36 contact hours observing, planning, instructing and assessing the student(s). Hours and reflections are recorded in a journal daily. Candidates must design a lesson plan and teach a 10- minute mini-lesson that is filmed based on the goals from the IEP. All data collected throughout each practicum is compiled in an e-portfolio, which catalogs the activities undertaken by the candidates including an analysis and description as well as artifacts collected. The candidate is required to collaborate with the onsite special education teacher. The university professor will either visit or meet with the candidate, collaborating special education teacher, and principal during the practicum to outline the expectations, standards and activities necessary to successfully meet the requirements. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPED 579 Practicum I. Note: Each Practicum requires qualifying employment in a school for the duration of the Practicum

Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPED 579 Practicum I.
Offered: Every year, Spring

SPED 581. Research in Special Education.3 Credits.

Candidates submit a proposal for research based on an area of interest in special education. Upon approval of their proposal, they conduct research, collect data and present their findings.

Offered: Every year

SPED 582. Research in Special Education.2 Credits.

In this course candidates will collaborate with a faculty advisor to identify a problem of practice in an area of special education. Upon approval of their proposal, they will conduct research and do a modified literature review of the problem and collect data. They will develop an action plan that will improve access for individuals with special needs. Since educators are also leaders, it is important to collaborate and share resources with colleagues. For this course, candidates will design a professional development plan based upon their research that could be shared with colleagues.

Prerequisites: Take SPED 503
Offered: Every year, Spring

SPED 650. Student Teaching/Special Education.6 Credits.

This six-credit course consists of a sixteen-week student teaching assignment. This will be accomplished through eight weeks with students of one disability and another eight weeks with students having a different disability. This assignment will be full time in a public school or an approved setting working with a trained cooperating teacher or mentor who supervises the candidate pursuing an initial certificate in special education. Teacher candidates will gain firsthand knowledge in the continuum of services in the field of special education. They will utilize strategies and best practices learned through their coursework and apply those to the students with whom they are working. The university coordinator must approve all placements and will advise the teacher candidate throughout the semester.

Prerequisites: Take SPED 680
Offered: Every year, Spring

SPED 680. Interprofessional Experience: Collaborative Special Educators & Law.2 Credits.

Throughout this course, candidates will alternately explore landmark cases, legislation, and the continuing struggle for social justice, self-determination, and the role of advocacy in bringing about life altering changes for people who are differently abled. work in interprofessional teams that laid the historical foundations of special education as well as an experiential experience to apply new knowledge and theory into practice by working in interprofessional teams. Candidates will view the continuing struggle for social justice and equity in education for differently abled people through the historical lens of special education. It was only through advocacy, legislation, and lawsuits that differently abled students won the right to FAPE. Over time, with the reauthorization of IDEA, the ability to work in interprofessional teams that made parents equal partners became the norm. addresses key laws such as IDEA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and the ADA.

Prerequisites: Take SPED 572
Offered: Every year, Fall

SPED 681. Advanced Interprofessional Experience Across All Levels.2 Credits.

This course is designed to provide the pre-service special educator with experiential opportunities to learn from and collaborate with a variety of health care and social services professionals who are integral to high quality special education services. The course provides multiple hands-on opportunities, case study analyses and interprofessional participation in mock applications involving the development, recommendation, evaluation, and assessment of providing special education services through interdisciplinary teams. Focus will be on developing co-teaching skills, understanding interprofessional models of healthcare and social services, promoting the respect of and cooperation with diverse roles and responsibilities, promoting share ethics and values, communication, and teamwork skills.

Prerequisites: Take SPED 680
Offered: Every year, Spring