The Department of Film, Television and Media Arts offers specialized programs that educate students in contemporary media practice, and demand that they excel as technically accom­plished, aesthetically grounded and expressively mature professionals. These programs are dedicated to skilled storytelling and the creation of documentary and narrative works in visual and audio media as well as other informative and entertaining programming for delivery on film, television, the Internet, mobile devices and all emerging media platforms.

To achieve these goals, students in the Department of Film, Television and Media Arts are immersed in techniques of visual storytelling that demand expertise in single and multi-camera video production and writing, directing and producing for film, television and streaming media. Because we believe that good media practice requires a solid understanding of media history, theory and criticism, this curriculum is balanced with courses that explore the role and impact of mass media in society. Formal coursework is not only taught on campus but in recent years has taken place in Los Angeles, Germany, Poland, the Czech Republic, France, and in Cape Town and Kruger National Park, South Africa.

Film, Television and Media Arts (FTM)

FTM 100. Special topics in Film, Television, and Media Arts.3 Credits.

This course is only open to high school students in the QU Academy program. The content of this course is specialized and varies by semester and by section. A variety of topics in film, television, and media arts may be covered. Students should consult the course description in the schedule for details on specific offerings.

Offered: As needed

FTM 102. Understanding Film.3 Credits.

This survey of the art, industry and techniques of global cinema introduces students to the significance of film as an international medium. By exposing students to the work of outstanding filmmakers and to the major elements of film language, the course helps students develop their critical faculties and visual literacy. The course includes some weekly 2 1/2-hour screenings of full-length theatrical feature films and other short clip screenings and lecture/discussion sessions.

Offered: Every year, All
UC: Fine Arts

FTM 110. Single Camera Production.3 Credits.

This course gives students a thorough grounding in the basic techniques of audio and video storytelling. Students learn basic audio production, visual composition, field camera practice, lighting fundamentals and digital video editing. This is a hands-on course that requires students to produce a number of media projects throughout the semester.

Offered: Every year, All

FTM 112. Multicamera Production.3 Credits.

This second course introduces students to the techniques of designing and producing creative and effective audiovisual communications primarily in a studio setting. Students learn to develop creative concepts and to take them from script to screen. Lighting, and principles of good composition, structure and program design are emphasized.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110.
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 230. Animation and Mobile Media.3 Credits.

This course introduces the concepts and production techniques that prepare students for creative work in mobile media. Students completing this course learn how to produce animated and interactive content for the web and mobile devices or kiosks. Projects may include simple animations, interactive stories, photo and video viewers, web interfaces, green screen, animations for video, and video projects optimized for the web.

Offered: As needed

FTM 240. Analysis of the Moving Image.3 Credits.

How do we read images? This course explores the techniques used to create moving image media-including film, television and interactive media-from a formal and aesthetic perspective. Students learn to think and write critically about how the techniques of production work to communicate ideas and convey meaning and emotion to viewers. Sophomore status required.

Offered: Every year, All

FTM 245. Intermediate Production.3 Credits.

Media messages are created to meet a variety of goals, which are tailored to appeal to defined audiences. Media can be designed to entertain, to inform, to educate, to persuade or to sell. In this course, students are challenged to discern what makes a good story or project idea for each of several different content objectives. Students work through all phases of preproduction and production including scriptwriting, scheduling and budgeting as they complete a series of projects during the semester, with special emphasis on creative conceptualization, message and writing.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110, FTM 112 and Sophomore status required.
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 280. Visual Effects (VFX) Techniques.3 Credits.

This is a foundational course in the field of visual effects, involving intensive hands-on production and post-production training. Topics include compositing, keying, rotoscoping, tracking, retouching, color manipulation, matching, mattes and cinematography and lighting for VFX. Preproduction concepts and techniques specific to VFX creation also are covered.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110 and FTM 112.
Offered: As needed, All

FTM 300. Special Topics.3 Credits.

New or experimental courses on a variety of topics in film, television and media arts that in the past have ranged from the impact of social media to visual effects.

Offered: As needed

FTM 320. History of Film I (to 1975).3 Credits.

This course, the first in a two-semester sequence, provides a foundation in the history and aesthetics of moving image arts. Through individual films, clips, lectures and discussion, students analyze the major international film movements, their genres, directors and themes that have contributed to the development of narrative cinema. Organized thematically, films are chosen to showcase aesthetic, historical, technological and ideological concepts and their impact on the evolution of film from its inception to 1975. Sophomore status required.

Offered: Every year, Fall
UC: Fine Arts

FTM 322. History of Film (and Television) II.3 Credits.

This course explores the history and aesthetics of moving image arts in film and also television from 1975 to the present. Through individual films, excerpts from films and television clips, lectures and discussion, students analyze the evolution of global television and major international film movements, their genres, directors and themes to understand how they have contributed to the development of television entertainment and narrative cinema. Organized thematically, works of film and television are chosen to showcase aesthetic, historical, technological and ideological concepts and their impact on the evolution of film and television. Sophomore status required.

Offered: Every year, Spring
UC: Fine Arts

FTM 330. Emerging Cinematography Techniques.3 Credits.

This course is designed to engage students in the cutting edge of cinematography and lighting. Students undertake in-depth exploration of developing concepts and become familiar with emerging technologies, equipment and narrative techniques through lectures, demonstrations and hands-on exercises.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110 and FTM 112.
Offered: As needed, All

FTM 342. Directing Film and Television.3 Credits.

Students are introduced to the history, theory and basic concepts of narrative single camera field and multicamera studio direction for current and developing distribution platforms. This course emphasizes principles of dramatic structure, script breakdown and analysis, visualization and story boarding, preproduction scheduling and casting, working with actors to effectively shape performances and working with crew. Students prepare and direct a series of short scenes.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110, FTM 112.
Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 355. Documentary Production.3 Credits.

This course challenges students to master the conceptual and technical skills of visual storytelling to produce more advanced, single-camera field projects on selected, specialized topics that may change from semester to semester. Past course content has included documentary production in South Africa and in Ireland, as well as in the United States. The course emphasizes professional production roles, including writing and directing, scheduling and production management, production, post-production, distribution and marketing. Sophomore status required.

Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 372. Screenwriting.3 Credits.

Students learn to shape stories for the screen. Emphasis is on dramatic structuring, character development, pacing and dialogue. Professional screenplays are analyzed and discussed, and final projects give students the opportunity to develop an original short screenplay.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 245 or permission of the department chair.
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 375. Projects in Single Camera and Lighting.3 Credits.

This course covers such topics as the characteristics and qualities of light, lighting control, principles of visual composition and design, color, contrast, the properties of lenses, how film emulsions and image sensors react to light, filters, matte boxes and other image control devices, metering and exposure control, the effective use of various lighting instruments and accessories, electrical safety and the basics of gripping and gaffing on set and on location. Students learn in an active, hands-on workshop environment and produce a major project.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110.
Offered: Every year, Fall

FTM 380. Projects in Audio Production.3 Credits.

In this course, students learn the theory and technique behind audio capture, editing and mixing. With audio production, students learn how to record for voice, ambience and other film/radio/TV applications. In mixing, students learn how to combine disparate audio ideas in order to make meaningful expressions that can complicate and amplify visual media. Participants learn that audio storytelling goes beyond language and can be employed for emotional effect in surprising ways. Students learn the basics of working in a DAW (Digital Audio Workspace) and also learn how to "round trip" audio through the Adobe Creative Suite. Participants learn how to improve audio in their own projects while also learning about careers such as sound mixer and podcast producer. No previous musical or technical training is required to take this course.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110.
Offered: As needed, All

FTM 390. Projects in Multicamera Production.3 Credits.

Attracting and keeping the audience's attention is the first responsibility of the director. This course gives students the opportunity to explore the art and craft of directing in a multicamera, high-definition studio environment. Participants examine the roles and responsibilities of the director, including shot composition, crew motivation, calling a live production and ethics. Students are asked to visually design a television program from concept to completion in a number of genres, including news, sports, sitcoms, dramas and commercials.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110, FTM 112.
Offered: Every year, Fall

FTM 392. Post-Production Techniques.3 Credits.

In this course, students explore such topics as the expressive capability of the editing process; how editing functions to "create" time, tempo, and visual rhythm; the "building" of scenes in editing to achieve various dramatic goals; and telling the story through careful control of sound and image over time. Students gain experience in using the tools and techniques of modern digital post-production technology. Topics include post-production workflow, the art of the cut, the Rule of Six, audio mixing, sound design, foley, primary color grading, and secondary color grading. Software utilized includes the Adobe Creative Suite and DaVinci Resolve.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110, FTM 112.
Offered: As needed

FTM 393. Animation Techniques.3 Credits.

Students learn to create sophisticated 2D and 3D still and animated electronic graphics for video that are aesthetically pleasing, expressive and meaningful. Principles of good design, composition and color are stressed, as well as the ability to produce visual interest in support of communication goals.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110, FTM 112.
Offered: Every year, All

FTM 397. Summer Production Project.4 Credits.

This advanced production course is for juniors majoring in film, television and media arts. It takes place on campus or on the Nice, France, campus of a major French film and video institute (ESRA, Paris), and involves the writing, shooting and editing of a polished video project that is then presented to a professional jury.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110, FTM 112.
Offered: As needed, Summer

FTM 399. Independent Study.1-6 Credits.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 110, FTM 112.
Offered: As needed

FTM 450. Senior Seminar in Film and Television.3 Credits.

This seminar entails an in-depth examination of issues and research perspectives in film and television. Seminar titles vary each term and may cover subject areas such as film history, reality television, political documentaries, docudrama and contemporary trends in the media industry. Students should consult the School of Communications course bulletin for information about each semester's offerings. Senior status is usually required.

Offered: Every year, All

FTM 493. Senior Project Colloquy: Preproduction.3 Credits.

This required 3-credit discussion, development, preproduction and production course must be taken in the semester prior to the student's undertaking of the Senior Project. Meeting collectively and individually, all fourth-year FTM students must be enrolled in this course in order to conceptualize and prepare preproduction materials essential for the successful completion of the Senior Project, and to undertake a new short production project, retrospective of their previous work. Individual class sessions are devoted to each aspect of preproduction and assignments that relate to each aspect are completed during the term. Senior status in FTM is required.

Offered: Every year, Fall

FTM 495. Senior Project Colloquy: Production.3 Credits.

In this capstone course, students are asked to create an individual thesis project that reflects the highest level of their abilities. From pitching their individual project ideas through writing, production and post-production, students are pushed to work at the peak of their skills. The creativity, quality and professionalism of the finished projects are judged by outside professionals and faculty and staff from the School of Communications FTM program, and give graduating seniors important portfolio material. Senior status in FTM is required.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 493.
Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 499. Independent Study.3 Credits.

FTM 501. Production Reconstruction.3 Credits.

: This class will teach and expand students' understanding of all aspects of prepping a feature film through lectures, experiential role-playing and weekly assignments. Students will analyze a produced film and will "recreate" all the steps to get into production including scheduling and budgeting through the use of industry standard software.

Offered: Every year, Fall

FTM 502. Advanced Production Management Workflow.3 Credits.

Students gain an overview of studio, independent, broadcast and streaming platforms content and management workflow needs. Contemporary practices in pre-production and production are stressed. Students pre-produce an episodic television show from the perspective of various production personnel and hold production meetings to gain an understanding of the pre-production and production process workflow for theatrical, TV episodic, TV situation comedy and documentary production including interactions with talent agencies and union signatory contracts.

FTM 503. Creative Development.3 Credits.

Students learn to shape stories for the screen and gain a comprehensive understanding of concept development, dramatic structuring, character development and dialogue. They learn the mechanics involved in the development of new projects, including script coverage, sourcing material, script notes, creative meetings, packaging a project, and how to effectively navigate the development journey.

Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 504. Production Scheduling and Introduction to Production Budgeting.3 Credits.

Students are given a finished but unproduced short screenplay or television episode and learn to break down and fully schedule that project. Theory of scheduling and output of details from the program are stressed.

FTM 505. Entertainment Law and Deal Making Practice.3 Credits.

Students gain an overview of contemporary entertainment law in regards to production including options, contracts, negotiations, copyright, IP, and licensing. Topics covers include how a producer protects themselves legally, find representation, and how to close deals.

FTM 506. Screenwriting II and Production Workshop.3 Credits.

Students author a theatrical feature screenplay or a pilot for an episodic television series or the full production plan for a documentary television multi-part series. In addition, they will also author, pre-produce, shoot, edit and distribute a 5-minute micro film.

Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 507. Production Budgeting.3 Credits.

Using industry-standard software packages, students plan and budget an unproduced short film. Special attention is paid to: location(s) of shoot; union globals and fringes and non-union and union taxes; contemporary practice in completion bonds. Guild and DGA surety bonds and Insurance requirements are also stressed.

FTM 508. Domestic and Worldwide Distribution and Sales for Film and TV.3 Credits.

Students gain an overview of contemporary domestic and international production management practices: office administration, paperwork and work flow; carnets, business visas, insurance and surety bond liability and management; industry national and international HR practices and payroll; international, state and local film, television and documentary production rules and regulations; tax incentives and responsibilities; national and international trade unions rules, rates, penalties, common regulations, compliances, visa requirements and international signatory practices.

FTM 509. Principles of Film, Television and Streaming Media Analytics, Sales and Distribution.3 Credits.

Students gain an overview of film, television and streaming media analytics and their applications. The international sales marketplace is examined with special emphasis agreements for international advertising, distribution and marketing. Students will create a business plan for a production company.

FTM 510. Principles of Post-Production Management.3 Credits.

Students gain an overview of post-production management including: staff roles and post production responsibilities, data storage and management, directors and authors rights and responsibilities to final cut, licensing, graphics and titling.

FTM 511. Film Finance Models.3 Credits.

This class is an overview of film, television and streaming finance models. Emphasis is on finance for the independent film market as well as productions involving the participation of major Hollywood production entities and/or broadcast and streaming platforms. Students create a finance model and business plan for a viable project.

Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 512. World Building and Creative Collaboration.3 Credits.

In this course, students will narratively "build" a world that they develop as a group. World building is a powerful tool that writers use to imagine a fantastical world that requires a complexity of vision such as seen in Star Wars or in any film or show that creates a new narrative world such as "Breaking Bad." This practice also helps producers to understand how to think about what's "not on the page" in a script in regards to production, and how to realize the vision of the director.

Prerequisites: Take FTM 503
Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 514. Modern Hollywood and the Future of the Industry.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the complexities of the industry and examines the intersection of art and business in the modern technological era of Hollywood. Topics include the evolution of production practices, distribution and exhibition of media, the role of labor and unions, how new technologies have shaped the industry and what the future holds for Hollywood. Students will deliver a research paper on applicable topics.

Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 515. Showrunning for TV.3 Credits.

How do TV shows get on the air? Students learn about and engage in the development process for a TV series or limited series. This class will also address what it takes to actually produce a show, and how to effectively lead as a showrunner.

Offered: Every year, Spring

FTM 550. Special Topics in Cinematic Production Management.3 Credits.

This course examines a specific topic or issue in production. Topics might focus on specific practice areas such as emerging technologies, or on industry issues and trends, such as the uses and impact of gaming platforms for virtual production pipelines, or the integrative relationship of talent management to production practices. Students may use this course to invesigate a cross-listed course in a department such as Game Design, Talent Management, Public Relations, Business.

Offered: As needed

FTM 601. Production Management Thesis Production.6 Credits.

Students polish their screenplay to final draft, schedule and budget their script, finalize their look book and produce a three to four scene sizzle reel of their script. Thesis Paper on topic of film required.

FTM 602. Production Internship/Apprenticeship.3 Credits.

Students seek and are engaged by a commercial, theatrical, episodic television or documentary for a professional production placement. Students must complete a minimum number of work hours as well as a reflection paper. Program director approval required.

Offered: As needed