Program Contact: Courtney Richards  203-582-8418

Our five-and-a-half-year, entry-level, Dual-Degree Bachelor of Science/Master of Occupational Therapy program prepares students with a breadth and depth of knowledge and skills to practice autonomously or collaboratively at entry-level, within various healthcare, educational and social systems. Our curriculum consists of three overlapping tiers: University Curriculum, professional component, and fieldwork. Upon successful completion of the fourth year, the BS in Health Science Studies is awarded. 

  • Tier 1: University Curriculum. During the first two years, students take most of their University Curriculum (UC) courses. Concurrently, students take prerequisite science courses for the OT program (PHY 101 + PHY 101L, BIO 211 + BIO 211L, BIO 212 + BIO 212L, and MA 275) as well as OT foundational courses (OT 101, OT 201 and OT 214). Prior to entry in the junior year, students must satisfy the following requirements: acquire a grade of B- or better in 100- and 200-level OT courses; satisfactorily complete a minimum of 40 credits of the University Curriculum; achieve a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or better; and achieve a science prerequisite GPA of 2.75 or better.
    It is highly recommended that students take all prerequisite science courses at Quinnipiac University. If a student is granted permission to take a science course at another four-year institution, the science grade will be factored into the required science GPA of 2.75. Failure to meet the cumulative GPA of 3.0 with Quinnipiac University courses only or the science prerequisite GPA of 2.75 by the start of the junior year will result in dismissal from the program.
  • Tier 2: Professional Component. The professional component of the program consists of all occupational therapy courses from the junior, senior and graduate years. Upon entry into the professional component, students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 each semester in the occupational therapy courses. To progress through the program, students must meet the minimum GPA of 3.0 and must earn a grade of C+ or above in all didactic courses and B+ or above in all fieldwork level I courses.
  • Tier 3: Fieldwork Component. All fieldwork level II experiences (OTM 580 and OTM 581) must be completed with a “P” (pass) to graduate.

Fieldwork Requirements

Students are responsible for transportation to all fieldwork experiences. All students are required to maintain a viable health insurance, malpractice insurance, CPR certification and current immunization record according to their fieldwork placements. A fieldwork site may have additional requirements as part of its affiliation agreement such as background checks and site-specific mandatory in-services. Failure to comply with fieldwork requirements may negatively impact a student's ability to participate in fieldwork. The department also requires current membership with the American Occupational Therapy Association.

Accreditation

The Quinnipiac Dual-Degree BS/MOT program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). The ACOTE address is:

c/o Accreditation Department
American Occupational Therapy Association
6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 200
North Bethesda, MD 20852-4929
Phone: 301-652-6611 (ext. 2914)
Fax: 301-652-1417
Email: accred@aota.org
Website: acoteonline.org c/o Accreditation Department

Program Sponsorship

Quinnipiac University assumes primary responsibility for appointment of faculty, admission of students, and curriculum planning for the Dual-Degree BS/MOT program. This responsibility includes the delivery of course content, satisfactory completion of the educational program, and granting of the degree. The university also is responsible for the coordination of classroom teaching and supervised fieldwork practice and for providing assurance that the practice activities assigned to students in a fieldwork setting are appropriate to the program.

Quinnipiac University complies with the administrative requirements for maintaining accreditation of the Dual-Degree BS/MOT program.

Dual-Degree BS/MOT Curriculum

The curriculum for the professional courses in the program are reviewed regularly and are subject to modification in both content and credit as deemed necessary to maintain a high-quality educational experience and keep current with best practices in the profession.

Plan of Study Grid
First Year
Fall SemesterCredits
BIO 101
101L
General Biology I
and General Biology I Lab
4
EN 101 Introduction to Academic Reading and Writing 3
FYS 101 First-Year Seminar 3
OT 101 Foundations of Occupational Therapy 2
UC Course 1 3
 Credits15
Spring Semester
BIO 102
102L
General Biology II
and General Biology Lab II
4
EN 102 Academic Writing and Research 3
MA 275 Biostatistics 3
OT 214 Professionalism in Occupational Therapy Practice 2
UC Course 2 3
 Credits15
Second Year
Fall Semester
BIO 211
211L
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
and Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab I
4
PHY 101
101L
Elements of Physics
and Elements of Physics Lab
4
UC Course 3 3
UC Course 4 3
HSC 202 Medical Terminology 2
 Credits16
Spring Semester
BIO 212
212L
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
and Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
4
UC Course 5 3
UC Course 6 3
UC Course 7 3
OT 201 Occupation, Health, Participation 2
 Credits15
Third Year
Fall Semester
OT 322
322L
Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology I
and Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab I
4
OT 325 Principles of Human Development and Occupation 3
OT 333
333L
Functional Neuroscience I
and Functional Neuroscience I Lab
4
HSC Community Engagement 2 2
Age-Related Community Engagement Youth (HSC 505)
or Community Engagement Legacy Service Learning Seminar: International (HSC 506)
or Interprofessional Community-Based Service Learning Seminar: Special Populations (HSC 507)
or Community Engagement Veterans
or Community Engagement Leadership
or Health Professions Career Practicum
HSC 220 Health Care Essentials: Structure, Policy and Professionalism (or HSC Elective) 1 3
 Credits16
Spring Semester
OT 323
323L
Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology II
and Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab II
4
OT 326 Principles of Human Development/Older Adults 3
OT 334 Functional Neuroscience II 2
HSC Community Engagement 2 1
Age-Related Community Engagement Youth (HSC 505)
or Community Engagement Legacy Service Learning Seminar: International (HSC 506)
or Interprofessional Community-Based Service Learning Seminar: Special Populations (HSC 507)
or Community Engagement Veterans
or Community Engagement Leadership
or Health Professions Career Practicum
HSC 220 Health Care Essentials: Structure, Policy and Professionalism (or HSC Elective) 1 3
Open Elective 1 3
 Credits16
Fourth Year
Fall Semester
OTM 501 OT Theory 3
OTM 502L OT Service Learning 1
QU 420 Integrative Capstone 3
OTM 503 OT Practice Framework and Professional Reasoning 2
OTM 505 Research Methods and Evidence-Based Practice 3
Open Elective 2 3
 Credits15
Spring Semester
OTM 522 OT For Children and Youth I 6
OTM 522L OT For Children & Youth I Lab 1
OTM 522F OT For Children & Youth I Fieldwork 1
OTM 520 OT Mental Health & Psychosocial Practice 3
OTM 520L OT Mental Health and Psychosocial Practice Lab 1
OTM 530 Administration and Management of System 3
 Credits15
 Total Credits123
1

HSC Electives may include HSC 262, HSC 322, HSC 326, HSC 354

2

HSC Community Engagement have options for 1, 2, or 3 credits at a time.

Students earn the Bachelor of Science in Health Science Studies after completing 123 credits.

Post-Baccalaureate Phase (Master’s)

Students earn the Master of Occupational Therapy after completing 54 credits in this phase.

Plan of Study Grid
Fifth Year
Summer SemesterCredits
MASTER'S YEAR 2
OTM 524 OT for Adults/Olders Adults I 6
OTM 524F OT for Adults/Older Adults I Fieldwork 1
OTM 524L OT for Adults/Older Adults I Lab 1
OTM 526 Technology in OT Practice 2
OTM 528L Biomechanical Interventions Lab 1
OTM 570 Scholarly Project I 1
 Credits12
Fall Semester
OTM 521 OT in Mental Health & Psychosocial Practice II 3
OTM 521L OT in Mental Health & Psychosocial Practice II Lab 1
OTM 521F OT in Mental Health & Psychosocial Practice II Fieldwork 1
OTM 523 OT for Children & Youth II 6
OTM 523L OT for Children & Youth II Lab 1
OTM 523F OT for Children & Youth II Fieldwork 1
OTM 571 Scholarly Project II 1
 Credits14
Spring Semester
OTM 525 OT for Adults/Older Adults II 6
OTM 525L OT for Adults/Older Adults II Lab 1
OTM 525F OT for Adults/Older Adults II Fieldwork 1
OTM 527 Work & Ergonomics 3
OTM 560 Special Topics in OT 2
OTM 562 Professional Development 2
OTM 572 Scholarly Project III 1
 Credits16
Sixth Year
Summer Semester
OTM 580 Fieldwork Level IIA 6
OTM 581 Fieldwork Level IIB 6
 Credits12
 Total Credits54

Progression, Retention and Graduation Requirements

All policies and procedures regarding progression, retention and graduation are found in the OT Student Manual. These policies and procedures are routinely reviewed with the students at the beginning of each semester and/or during advising.

University Curriculum and OT Prerequisite Phase

Prior to entry in the junior year, students must satisfy the following requirements:

  • Complete a minimum of 40 credits of the University Curriculum, all OT prerequisites and all OT foundational courses with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0;
  • All foundational OT courses must be at a grade of B- or better; and
  • Achieve a minimum science GPA of 2.75. Courses that are considered in the science GPA are BIO 101 +BIO 101L, BIO 102 + BIO 102L and all the OT prerequisites.

Professional Component and Fieldwork Phases

To progress through the program, students must meet the minimum semester GPA of 3.0 and must earn a grade of C+ or above in all didactic courses and B+ or above in all fieldwork level I courses. In addition, all students must acquire a “Pass” in their fieldwork level II. Failing to meet the aforementioned requirements will result in a referral to the Occupational Therapy Academic Progression and Retention Committee (APRC). The outcome of such referral may be: program probation with course remediation; a program probation with a course repeat (and repay); or a program dismissal.

All courses must be taken sequentially as indicated in the program of study. Students may request in writing to the department chairperson, any deviations from the course sequence, waivers from occupational therapy courses, and/or transfer credits from other occupational therapy programs. All requests must be approved by the Occupational Therapy APRC and the department chairperson.

Successful completion of all didactic and fieldwork requirements is necessary for graduation with the degree of Master of Occupational Therapy.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the baccalaureate phase of the Dual-Degree Bachelor of Science/Master of Occupational Therapy (BS/MOT) program, students will demonstrate the following competencies:

  1. Synthesis of Occupation: Articulate in-depth knowledge of occupation with health and participation to guide the practice of occupational therapy.                

  2. Professional Identity and Role Competence: Demonstrate professionalism and competent role performance.  

  3. Advocacy: Advocate for the distinct value of occupational therapy for individuals, groups and populations. 
  4. Professional Reasoning: Apply occupation and client-centered principles and professional reasoning as part of the occupational therapy process to produce positive outcomes with individuals, communities and populations within systems. 
  5. Evidence-Based Practice and Knowledge Translation: Evaluate, synthesize, translate and contribute evidence to inform practice and support the delivery of OT services.  
  6. Occupational Therapy Roles in Systems and Practice Contexts: Demonstrate knowledge of systems and occupational therapy roles in order to work collaboratively in intra/interprofessional teams within traditional and role emerging settings.  

Mission Statement

The Department of Occupational Therapy aims to provide high-quality education to develop occupational therapy practitioner-scholars, who possess broad-based knowledge and can influence meaningful change in the health and functioning of individuals, populations and communities.

Philosophy

The OT Department views the entry-level educational experience with a developmental-humanistic lens. This approach acknowledges that each student has unique experiences and possesses varying abilities, which are brought to the university environment and further developed through liberal and disciplinary inquiry as well as, co-curricular, community-based/experiential learning and professional experiences.

The department conceptualizes “development” not merely as a sequential ontological event but rather as a complex iterative, heterarchical and hierarchical sets of processes that are situated in various contexts. This developmental curriculum concept is reflected below using Fink's Taxonomy of Significant Learning:

  • Foundational Knowledge (and Caring and Learning to Learn) – refers to understanding, remembering information and ideas; developing interests and professional values; and developing the skills to learn or self-direct one’s learning
  • Application and Integration (and Learning About Oneself/Others) – refers to development of practical, creative and critical thinking skills by connecting ideas/concepts, events and realms of life; as well as developing a depth of awareness of oneself and of others
  • Application and Synthesis – refers to continued refinement of practical, creative and critical thinking skills through understanding of systems and embracing one’s agency

Through advising, mentorship and curricular experiences, the faculty applies a humanistic approach to support students in their personal and professional growth toward becoming an entry-level occupational therapist. Students are also taught the value and potential of every human being and their capacity to self-determine.

Admission to the Program

The high school student applying for admission to the Occupational Therapy program should present four years of mathematics and four years of science. The general Quinnipiac University requirements for admissions must be met. All students applying for admission are strongly encouraged to have 10–20 hours of observation in occupational therapy. The department is prepared to provide reasonable accommodations for students who have special needs or challenges.

Transfer Students

The Occupational Therapy department has procedures in place for transfer admission into the Dual-Degree Bachelor of Science/Master of Occupational Therapy program. Acceptance as a transfer into the BS/MOT program is on a space-available basis only. When the number of qualified applicants exceeds the number of available slots, prospective students will be evaluated and ranked. A student with a prior history of dismissal from any of the programs within the Occupational Therapy department is ineligible for transfer admission. Additional information is available upon request from Program Director Courtney Richards at courtney.richards@quinnipiac.edu; 203-582-8418 or Professor Deanna Proulx-Sepelak at deanna.proulx-sepelak@quinnipiac.edu; 203-582-8675.

Additional Program Costs

As a clinical education program, the BS/MOT dual degree major requires some expenses that go beyond standard university tuition and fees:

  1. Clinical/Fieldwork Education Travel – Students are responsible for all expenses (gas, parking, maintenance) related to transportation to get to a fieldwork site. This includes  private transportation, public transportation, and air travel as necessary. Cost: variable
  2. Immunizations – Consistent with the School of Health Sciences policy, all students must have a full battery of immunizations and in some cases titer affirmation of immunity for common diseases including but not limited to: MMR, HepB, varicella, polio, TDAP, TB and influenza. These must be documented prior to the start of clinical experiences during the sophomore year and must be maintained through the undergraduate education. Cost: variable (please check with your insurance carrier)
  3. Background Check – All students must undergo an initial background check prior to the start of any clinical/fieldwork experience. Students in the BS/MOT program are required to have a background check prior to the start of the clinical portion of the curriculum in Junior year and again before beginning Level II fieldwork. 
    1. Initial background check cost is $63 for all domestic addresses for the past 7 years or $158  for students who have resided in New York state in the last 7 years due to NY state surcharge.
    2. Some clinical fieldwork sites may require an additional yearly background recheck. Cost: $32 per annual recheck
  4. Drug Screening – Drug screenings may be required and are dependent upon individual fieldwork site requirements. Cost: $42.25
  5. Liability Insurance  All students have liability insurance coverage through the university, free of charge, while performing required clinical activity. Students may choose to purchase additional coverage at their own expense.
  6. EXXAT and APPROVE – FOR THOSE PROGRAMS USING EXXAT ONLY. Students enrolled in professional programs must enroll in EXXAT and APPROVE. 
    1. EXXAT is the clinical tracking and assessment program used by the School of Health Sciences. Cost: one-time payment of $150 per student for the BS/MOT major (students are responsible for this cost).
    2. APPROVE is the program within EXXAT that tracks all student health and safety records, provides documentation to prospective clinical sites, and provides notification of impending expiration dates. Cost: $35 for first year, $10 per year thereafter
  7. Professional Association Membership  All occupational therapy students are required to purchase a student membership from the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA).  The cost of the student membership is $75 per year. Students have full access to all of the resources as part of this membership including journal articles, videos, and other class and professional learning materials needed for program completion. 
  8. Certification Examination Costs  All occupational therapy students upon successful completion of the academic and fieldwork requirements of the BS/MOT program must take a certification examination in order to practice as a registered occupational therapist. This is given by the National Board of Certification of Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) and costs $555.00 (2021 cost) to take the examination.  

The Quinnipiac Dual-Degree BS/MOT program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA). The ACOTE address is:

c/o Accreditation Department
American Occupational Therapy Association
6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 200
North Bethesda, MD 20852-4929
Phone: 301-652-6611 (ext. 2914)
Fax: 301-652-1417
Email: accred@aota.org
Website: acoteonline.org

Accreditation

The combined Bachelor of Science/Master of Occupational Therapy program at Quinnipiac University is an entry-level master’s degree program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449. ACOTE’s telephone number c/o AOTA is 301-652-AOTA, and its web address is acoteonline.org. Graduates of the occupational therapy program are eligible to sit for the NBCOT (National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy) exam. After successful completion of the exam, you will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). All states and jurisdictions require graduation from an ACOTE-accredited occupational therapy program and passing the NBCOT exam as a requirement for state licensure.

State-by-State Occupational Therapy Licensure

All 50 states and the jurisdictions of Washington, D.C.; Guam; and Puerto Rico have licensure laws for occupational therapists. The American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) website provides links to state regulations regarding qualifications and licensure, continuing competency requirements, regulations, supervision and telehealth.

NBCOT offers an interactive US map with links to each state’s OT State Regulatory Board Contact List and AOTA links to each state’s licensure requirements.

AOTA’s Student Guide to Registration and Licensure offers a self-directed “tour” for graduates seeking information on the NBCOT exam and obtaining state licensure.  

Quinnipiac University complies with the administrative requirements for maintaining accreditation of the Dual-Degree BS/MOT program.

Occupational Therapy (OT)

OT 101. Foundations of Occupational Therapy.2 Credits.

This course provides students with the foundations of occupational therapy practice including its philosophical and historical origins, as well as its core beliefs and principles. The course also presents the various occupational therapy practice settings--both traditional and emerging--and highlights how the foundations of OT practice are threaded across settings.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 201. Occupation, Health, Participation.2 Credits.

This course introduces the concept of occupation as central to the practice of occupational therapy. Emphasis is on the relationship between occupation and health. Using methods of inquiry, students gain a deeper understanding of occupational performance and its determinants from a person-centered to a population- and institution-centered perspective. Theoretical models focused on occupations are explored and applied to assessing and enhancing occupational performance.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 214. Professionalism in Occupational Therapy Practice.2 Credits.

This course serves as a bridge from students' general education to the professional phase of the OT curriculum. Students explore features of contemporary occupational therapy practice, such as client-centeredness and evidence-based practice, as foundations to professionalism. Students integrate Quinnipiac essential learning proficiencies into the context of occupational therapy practice. Finally, the course helps students to internalize the values of professionalism as keys to being an effective change agent.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 322. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology I.3 Credits.

This course is a comprehensive, two-part series designed to provide students with foundational expertise in human biomechanics. Students examine the musculoskeletal system in conjunction with principles of kinetics and kinematics as the basis of practice in physical rehabilitation. The course includes a corequisite laboratory to develop competency in basic biomechanical safety and assessment (goniometry and manual muscle testing). The series culminates by merging all aspects of human movement as the basis for engaging in everyday occupational activities.

Prerequisites: Take BIO 211, BIO 212, PHY 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 322L. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab I.1 Credit.

This lab, which accompanies OT 322, provides the opportunity to learn in the Human Anatomy Lab, Clinical Skills Lab, Rehabilitation Science Lab and the Model Apartment as students develop proficiency with basic biomechanical safety and assessment (goniometry and manual muscle testing). This variety of laboratory settings serves to enhance content delivered in the classroom; students are guided to first visualize human anatomy via donor dissection and then apply that learning in the simulated clinical settings. Students are alternately scheduled among spaces weekly and in accordance with progression of region in the human body. (2 lab hrs.)

Prerequisites: Take BIO 211, BIO 212, PHY 101.
Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 323. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology II.3 Credits.

This course is part two of a comprehensive series designed to provide students with foundational expertise in human biomechanics. Students continue their examination of the musculoskeletal system in conjunction with principles of kinetics and kinematics as the basis of practice in physical rehabilitation. The series culminates by merging all aspects of human movement as the basis for engaging in everyday occupational activities.

Prerequisites: Take OT 322.
Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 323L. Functional Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab II.1 Credit.

This lab, which accompanies OT 323, provides an opportunity to learn in the Human Anatomy Lab, Clinical Skills Lab, Rehabilitation Science Lab and the Model Apartment as students develop proficiency with basic biomechanical safety and assessment (goniometry and manual muscle testing). This variety of laboratory settings enhances content delivered in the classroom. Students are guided to first visualize human anatomy via donor dissection and then apply that learning in the simulated clinical settings. Students are alternately scheduled among spaces weekly and in accordance with progression of region in the human body. (2 lab hrs.)

Prerequisites: Take OT 322L.
Offered: Every year, Spring

OT 325. Principles of Human Development and Occupation.3 Credits.

This course explores normal development and its impact on age appropriate occupations. The age span is from conception through early adulthood. The course provides a foundation for evaluation and intervention in human occupation.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 326. Principles of Human Development/Older Adults.3 Credits.

This course builds on the developmental concepts from OT 325 to explore normal development and its impact on age appropriate occupations. The age span is from early to late adulthood. The course provides a foundation for evaluation and intervention in human occupation as well as a foundation in performance patterns, skills and context.

Offered: Every year, Fall and Spring

OT 333. Functional Neuroscience I.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive study of neuroanatomy including the structures, functions and physiology of neural systems that are key to normal human health and function. The course provides a strong foundation for future study on neural substrates of health conditions and occupational performance. The course also introduces basic screening procedures to identify neurobehavioral dysfunctions.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 333L. Functional Neuroscience I Lab.1 Credit.

This course supplements OT 333 Functional Neuroscience I lecture and provides a comprehensive study of neuroanatomy including the structures, functions and physiology of neural systems that are key to normal human health and function. The course also introduces basic screening procedures to identify neurobehavioral dysfunctions.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OT 334. Functional Neuroscience II.2 Credits.

This course builds on functional neuroanatomy as it examines the interrelationships of neuroanatomical structures, subsystems and neurophysiologic processes involved in human behaviors, which are the foundation for occupational performance. Specifically, students learn the neural substrates and mechanisms of motor behaviors, sensory-perception, language, attention, memory and learning. The course continues to introduce basic screening procedures to identify neurobehavioral dysfunctions.

Offered: Every year, Spring

Occupational Therapy (OTM)

OTM 501. OT Theory.3 Credits.

This course explores how occupations influence health and well-being from a historical, developmental, and evidence-based perspective. Current and emerging occupation-based models are analyzed and applied as theoretical foundations in the promotion of health, prevention of disease, and management of occupational disruptions across the life span. Complementary healthcare models and current global social political issues are highlighted.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OTM 502L. OT Service Learning.1 Credit.

This course applies the concepts of observation and therapeutic use of self to a community setting where the students will observe and conduct an applied activity analysis of the clients/community and/or the population in order to design service projects that meet the occupational needs of those being served in the setting. Application of context variable analysis and service provision in a meaningful occupation will provide a natural experience of learning about human occupations.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OTM 503. OT Practice Framework and Professional Reasoning.2 Credits.

This course explores the vocabulary of the profession, The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework, and links the terminology to knowledge and skills in the identification and analysis of occupation in context, personal factors and occupational performance and the application of clinical reasoning to the occupational therapy process.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OTM 505. Research Methods and Evidence-Based Practice.3 Credits.

This course addresses research fundamentals in the practice of occupational therapy. The course examines research epistemology, methods, research designs, and data analysis in occupational therapy research. Levels of evidence are addressed and applied to decisions in occupational therapy interventions. Students gain experience developing research procedures, critically analyzing data, and identifying ethical issues involved in developing a research study.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OTM 520. OT Mental Health & Psychosocial Practice.3 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of OT's role for children and youth with mental health and psychosocial needs. Emphasis is on the role of occupation in promoting mental health, preventing disease and managing life disruptions. Psychological and OT theories guide the student's learning of the OT process within community-based and institutional settings across the continuum of service delivery. The inclusion of documentation, therapeutic use of self and evidence-based practice are emphasized

Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 520L. OT Mental Health and Psychosocial Practice Lab.1 Credit.

This course builds upon concepts from OTM 520 highlighting OT's distinct value in addressing psychosocial and mental health needs among children and youth, groups, and organizations. Students will practice assessments and evidence-based intervention modalities for various mental health conditions across the life span. Application of theoretical models and frames of reference will be highlighted. Additionally, students will enhance observation skills needed for documentation and practice verbal interventions related to therapeutic modes.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 521. OT in Mental Health & Psychosocial Practice II.3 Credits.

This course highlights OT's distinct value in addressing psychosocial and mental health needs among adult and older adult populations, groups, and organizations. Emphasis is on the role of occupation in promoting mental health, preventing disease and managing life disruptions. OT, psychosocial, & group theories, as well as, group interventions are highlighted. Related skills such as documentation, therapeutic use of self and evidence-based practice are emphasized.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OTM 521F. OT in Mental Health & Psychosocial Practice II Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides structured fieldwork observation in various settings working with the mental health and psychosocial populations across the lifespan; it will allow the student to observe and explore the evaluation and intervention process utilized in occupational therapy. Students will also have the opportunity to observe and report on the variety of assessment and intervention tools utilized across a continuum of service delivery. Students will develop an appreciation for the frames of reference used in the models of practice, as a guide to the evaluation and intervention process.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OTM 521L. OT in Mental Health & Psychosocial Practice II Lab.1 Credit.

This lab builds upon concepts from OT 521 highlighting OT's distinct value in addressing psychosocial and mental health needs among adult and older adult populations, groups, and organizations. Emphasis is on the role of occupation in promoting mental health, preventing disease and managing life disruptions. Group theory and evidence-based group interventions are practiced to promote the therapeutic use of self. A culminating group protocol assignment integrates theory, practice, and research.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OTM 522. OT For Children and Youth I.6 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of pediatric health conditions as they alter function and participation, environmental factors as they relate to barriers for occupational performance, and evaluation and interventions used by occupational therapy practitioners for children and youth. Traditional theoretical models/frames of reference and current evidence will be utilized as a basis for the clinical/professional reasoning process applicable to the OT process for children and youth so that facilitators and barriers to occupational performance can be identified. Documentation related to contextual philosophies, procedures, and regulations dictating pediatric practice will be highlighted throughout the course.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 522F. OT For Children & Youth I Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides structured fieldwork observation in various settings working with the children/youth population; it will allow the student to observe and explore the evaluation and intervention process utilized in occupational therapy. Students will also have the opportunity to observe and report on the variety of assessment and intervention tools utilized within the models of healthcare for the children and youth population.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 522L. OT For Children & Youth I Lab.1 Credit.

This lab course complements the OTM 522 and OTM 522F and provides opportunity for experiential learning of the evaluation process and intervention techniques used in occupational therapy for children and youth. The safe, efficient, and culturally sensitive delivery of specific assessment and intervention techniques are highlighted.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 523. OT for Children & Youth II.6 Credits.

This course provides an in-depth analysis of sensory processing and integration with a focus on clinical reasoning to understand and appreciate the impact of these processes on individuals, populations and community environments. Opportunities are provided to learn specific intervention strategies for individuals, as well a systems approach emphasizing the importance of educating the team of people who support these individuals in varying contexts, to facilitate functional participation and engagement in purposeful and productive activities. Documentation within these various systems will be illustrated, discussed, and produced.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OTM 523F. OT for Children & Youth II Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides structured fieldwork observation in sensory integration settings and allows the student to observe and explore the intervention process utilized in these frames of reference. Students will also have the opportunity to see, observe and report on the variety of intervention strategies utilized within the various models such as healthcare, education, community and social systems. The settings utilized are equipped to provide clinical application of principles learned in the OT curriculum and focus on the sensory integration intervention process.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OTM 523L. OT for Children & Youth II Lab.1 Credit.

This lab integrates the advanced intervention techniques / specialized interventions used by occupational therapy practitioners for individuals and populations with sensory integrative and processing difficulties, developmental disabilities, and brain-based behavioral challenges. Opportunities will be provided to learn specific interventions required for a variety of occupational therapy practice contexts and with consideration of cultural and environmental factors.

Offered: Every year, Fall

OTM 524. OT for Adults/Olders Adults I.6 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of various conditions that impact health and occupational performance among adults and older adult populations, with emphasis given to understanding common diagnoses encountered and assessments and interventions used by occupational therapy practitioners in general medicine/surgery, neurology, and orthopedics. This course will integrate the use of various theoretical models/frames of reference, current evidence, and clinical/professional reasoning pertinent to the OT process. Documentation will be highlighted throughout the course including for traditional systems for individual and population-based approaches. Key concepts in interprofessional practice and health literacy will be incorporated.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OTM 524F. OT for Adults/Older Adults I Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides structured fieldwork observation in various settings working with the adult population; it will allow the student to observe and explore the evaluation and treatment process utilized in occupational therapy with adults and older adults. Students will develop an appreciation for the frame of reference used in the models of practice as a guide to evaluation and treatment.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OTM 524L. OT for Adults/Older Adults I Lab.1 Credit.

This lab course complements the OTM 524 and OTM 524F and provides opportunity for experiential learning of the evaluation process and intervention techniques used in occupational therapy for adults and older adults. The safe, efficient and culturally sensitive delivery of specific assessment and intervention techniques are highlighted.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OTM 525. OT for Adults/Older Adults II.6 Credits.

This course provides a comprehensive overview of specialized interventions used by occupational therapy practitioners in neurorehabilitation, oncology and geriatrics/gerontology. This course will integrate the use of various theoretical models/frames of reference, current evidence, and clinical/professional reasoning pertinent to the OT process in neurorehabilitation practice. Documentation will be highlighted throughout the course for traditional and emerging systems for individual and population-based approaches. Key concepts in interprofessional practice and health literacy will be incorporated.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 525F. OT for Adults/Older Adults II Fieldwork.1 Credit.

This course provides structured fieldwork observation in neuro-rehabilitative settings and allows the student to observe and explore the intervention process utilized in these frames of reference. The settings utilized are equipped to provide clinical application of principles learned in the OT curriculum and focus on the neurorehabilitation intervention process.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 525L. OT for Adults/Older Adults II Lab.1 Credit.

This lab integrates the advanced intervention techniques discussed and described in the lecture portion of this class. Opportunities will be provided to learn specific interventions required for a variety of occupational therapy practice contexts and with consideration of cultural and environmental factors.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 526. Technology in OT Practice.2 Credits.

This course provides students with exposure to advanced intervention techniques related to assistive technology in occupational therapy. The course focuses on application of assistive technology across the lifespan, and thus emphasizes use of both interventions in a variety of practice contexts and practice settings. Since technology options change rapidly, emphasis is on the clinical reasoning process used to select and evaluate interventions in education, home, work, leisure and community practice domains.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OTM 527. Work & Ergonomics.3 Credits.

This course focuses on the occupation of work applied across the lifespan and to various practice contexts and worker challenges. The course addresses topics related to the occupation of work, including employment acquisition, job performance, volunteerism, and retirement. Work tasks and work demands are analyzed relative to physical, cognitive, social, organizational, and environmental factors that impact job performance. Modifications that optimize worker functioning are examined as prevention and as rehabilitation.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 528L. Biomechanical Interventions Lab.1 Credit.

Students experience hands on learning in safe and effective application of biomechanically-oriented interventions and principles for splinting, physical agent modalities, and therapeutic exercise programs. Specifically, students evaluate and fabricate splints for specific diagnoses and discuss the role of splinting as part of an overall intervention plan. Students are introduced to various prosthetic devices and the role of occupational therapy during pre-prosthetic and prosthetic training. Students demonstrate the ability to use and apply various physical agent modalities to intervention planning assignments.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OTM 530. Administration and Management of System.3 Credits.

This class introduces students to the daily management functions of an occupational therapy department including planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and supervision of occupational therapy assistants and other department personnel. The course integrates students' knowledge of interventions with information related to the delivery of occupational therapy services. Topics include managed care, quality assurance, leadership, regulatory agencies, models of practice, ethics, and consultation. Students gain hands-on experience with budgeting, marketing, program evaluation, and ethical problem-solving in administration.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 560. Special Topics in OT.2 Credits.

Students will delve deeper into the specialized knowledge of the profession with evidence-based, occupation-centered practice as its core subject. Exploration of specialized roles beyond that of a direct provider of skilled services, such as educator, case manager, and consultant at the systems level. Students will also learn various modes of care delivery and systems of care and evaluate the outcomes of such modes.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 562. Professional Development.2 Credits.

This course focuses on the current issues related to transitioning from student to professional roles and responsibilities. The course emphasizes linking theory to practice, self-analysis and reflection upon academic experience, and relating those to different facets of clinical and professional reasoning in practice. Topics include updates in the OT profession with a focus on official documents; emerging roles of OT in practice; credentialing, licensure, and continuing competence/professional development. Contemporary issues of practice such as access to services, advocacy, and inter-/intra-professional collaboration will be explored.

Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 570. Scholarly Project I.1 Credit.

This course is the first of a series of capstone seminars designed to assist the students in understanding the elements and process of participating in the research process. Under faculty mentorship, students are expected to complete a comprehensive literature review related to their topic of study.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OTM 571. Scholarly Project II.1 Credit.

Under faculty mentorship, students in small groups participate in the design and implementation of entry-level research studies by analyzing and interpreting the professional literature, and beginning to work on their spring capstone project.

Prerequisites: TAKE OTM 570
Offered: Every year, Fall

OTM 572. Scholarly Project III.1 Credit.

This seminar course is designed to facilitate the completion of the students Capstone Project and promote an in-depth reflection on the program learning outcomes. Final outcome of the seminar is a scholarly manuscript and public dissemination of the results of the completed project.

Prerequisites: TAKE OTM 570 OTM 571
Offered: Every year, Spring

OTM 580. Fieldwork Level IIA.6 Credits.

This 12-week full-time supervised fieldwork experience provide the student with the opportunity to apply theory and clinical reasoning skills to the occupational therapy evaluation and intervention process for clients across the life span and in a variety of life environments. Students must abide by all fieldwork policies as listed in the Student Fieldwork Manual. This is the first of two required level II experiences.

Offered: Every year, Summer

OTM 581. Fieldwork Level IIB.6 Credits.

This 12-week full-time supervised fieldwork experience provide the student with the opportunity to apply theory and clinical reasoning skills to the occupational therapy evaluation and intervention process for clients across the life span and in a variety of life environments. Students must abide by all fieldwork policies as listed in the Student Fieldwork Manual. This is the second of two required level II experiences and is different in setting/population from OTM 580.

Prerequisites: TAKE OTM 580
Offered: Every year, Fall